Differences between revisions 11 and 12
Revision 11 as of 2021-02-20 08:08:13
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Revision 12 as of 2021-02-20 08:16:44
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Deletions are marked like this. Additions are marked like this.
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These animations show how the rotor bolts disassemble before rotating and passing through
the deflection magnets. The gray represents transformer laminations, which will actually
be quite thin with just enough insulation between them to electrically isolate the
laminations and allow field penetration.
These animations are not to scale.
Line 16: Line 13:
The six longitudinal gaps will be just wide enough to admit a stationary winding, plus
some enough tolerance to keep the winding from touching the hypervelocity rotor.
The only way this will work is if the windings dip inwards briefly before and after
sled passage, are maintained exactly in the center (somehow) by eddy currents, and of
course the 14 km/s rotor moves in a very high vacuum.
They qualitatively illustrate how the rotor bolts disassemble before rotating and passing through the deflection magnets. The gray represents transformer laminations, which will actually be quite thin with just enough insulation between them to electrically isolate the laminations and allow field penetration.
Line 22: Line 15:
This does not show the longitudinal copper windings and optical SCRs wrapped around
the poles, which pin the magnetic excitation field in the rotor, and subsequently
provide motor thrust for the passage through the motor windings
As a wild guess, the bolt sections will be 10 meters long, and the diameter perhaps 4 centimeters. They will be spaced perhaps a centimeter apart (between the ends) longitudinally at 80km altitude (perhaps overlapping), increasing to 5 centimeters near the surface as the rotor descends and increases velocity (same mass flow rate, Bernoulli effect written in iron).
Line 26: Line 17:
A magnetic field is synchronously imprinted on the rotor; the "slip" will be small,
and the risetime of the field will be around 200 microseconds.
The six longitudinal gaps will be narrower than shown; just wide enough to admit a stationary winding, plus some enough tolerance to keep the winding from touching the hypervelocity rotor.

The only way this will work is if the windings dip inwards briefly before and after sled passage, are maintained exactly in the center (somehow) by eddy currents, and of course the 14 km/s rotor moves in a very high vacuum. If windings are damaged, the won't be commanded to "dip" and there will be a millsecond-scale interruption in thrust.

Flux is circumferential. This animation does not show the longitudinal copper windings and optical SCRs wrapped around the poles, which pin the magnetic excitation field in the rotor, and subsequently provide motor thrust for the passage through the motor windings

A magnetic field is synchronously imprinted on the rotor; the "slip" will be small, and the risetime of the field will be around 200 microseconds.

Rotor Animations

Sorry, ancient shockwave flash, your web browser may complain, so you will need to enable flash animations for this page. I will upgrade these animations to MPEG when I upgrade this website (and learn how).


Embedded application/x-shockwave-flash

Embedded application/x-shockwave-flash


These animations are not to scale.

They qualitatively illustrate how the rotor bolts disassemble before rotating and passing through the deflection magnets. The gray represents transformer laminations, which will actually be quite thin with just enough insulation between them to electrically isolate the laminations and allow field penetration.

As a wild guess, the bolt sections will be 10 meters long, and the diameter perhaps 4 centimeters. They will be spaced perhaps a centimeter apart (between the ends) longitudinally at 80km altitude (perhaps overlapping), increasing to 5 centimeters near the surface as the rotor descends and increases velocity (same mass flow rate, Bernoulli effect written in iron).

The six longitudinal gaps will be narrower than shown; just wide enough to admit a stationary winding, plus some enough tolerance to keep the winding from touching the hypervelocity rotor.

The only way this will work is if the windings dip inwards briefly before and after sled passage, are maintained exactly in the center (somehow) by eddy currents, and of course the 14 km/s rotor moves in a very high vacuum. If windings are damaged, the won't be commanded to "dip" and there will be a millsecond-scale interruption in thrust.

Flux is circumferential. This animation does not show the longitudinal copper windings and optical SCRs wrapped around the poles, which pin the magnetic excitation field in the rotor, and subsequently provide motor thrust for the passage through the motor windings

A magnetic field is synchronously imprinted on the rotor; the "slip" will be small, and the risetime of the field will be around 200 microseconds.

RotorAnimations (last edited 2021-02-20 08:16:44 by KeithLofstrom)